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"‘there has never been a general strike." — Mariarosa Dalla Costa, “The General Strike” in All Work and No Pay (Falling Wall Press, 1975)

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"Hey, guess what? You’re a woman. You can write like a woman."

—Ursula K. Le Guin

http://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/6253/the-art-of-fiction-no-221-ursula-k-le-guin

(via chrisjrice)

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"Mostly I just think that Atticus Finch is one of, if not the best example of healthy masculinity in literature."

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Sex workers throughout the world share a uniquely maligned mystique that simultaneously positions them as sexually desirable and socially stigmatized. In order to better understand how these processes function cross-culturally, ‘Demystifying Sex Work and Sex Workers’ combines thirteen articles by scholar-activists and sex workers in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, India, Mexico, Thailand, Uganda and the U.S. that focus on the everyday lives of sex workers, broadly defined as those who exchange sexual services for something of value. Papers in this issue locate sex workers as actors and agents despite pervasive social messages and discourses to the contrary.
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'everyone can make mistakes, even Hegel, who pretends to be able to escape this common condition'
Macherey, p.17

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Sometimes we treat emotions as if they are facts about the world: The stronger the emotion, the stronger our belief that the emotion is based on absolute fact. “If I feel unsure, I am incompetent.” The stronger the emotion, the stronger our belief is that the emotion is based on absolute fact. “If I feel unsure, I am incompetent.” “If I get lonely when left alone, I shouldn’t be left alone.” If I feel confident about something, it is right.” “If I’m afraid, it is threatening.” “I love him, so he must be OK.”
If we assume that our emotions represent facts about the world, we may use them to validate our thoughts or our actions. This can be trouble if our emotions get us to ignore the facts.

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